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Full text of "North Carolina tobacco report [serial]"

THE BULLETIN 

of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 
Number 119 April, 1950 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 
State Library of North Carolina 



http://www.archive.org/details/northcarolinatob19491950 



FOREWORD 

A wealth of information about tobacco, North Caro- 
lina's most important crop, is collected by the State 
Department of Agriculture. Most of this information 
is released to the press while it is still news, or is 
published in circular form by this or other public 
agencies. 

There has been a long-felt need, however, for bring- 
ing such information together in a single, ready-refer- 
ence publication for free distribution to the public. It is 
the purpose of this issue of The Bulletin — Tobacco 
Report for 1949-1950 — to fill that need. The informa- 
tion has been compiled and prepared by Messers W. P. 
Hedrick and J. H. Cyrus, tobacco specialists of the 
Division of Markets, and edited by the Publications 
Division. 

We trust that you will find this Tobacco Report both 
interesting and helpful ; and you doubtless will be glad 
to know that we are planning to make it an annual 
publication. 




Commissioner of Agriculture 



Raleigh, N. C. 



For free distribution by the Tobacco Branch, Markets Division, North Carolina 
Department of Agriculture, Raleigh, N. C. 



3-50-5M. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Marketing Flue-Cured Tobacco 5 

Tobacco Summary — 1949 11 

Tobacco Marketed by N. C. Producers and Yield Per Acre . . 13 

North Carolina 1950 Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 14 



North Carolina Tobacco Warehouse Sales Report 

1949-1950 16 



Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales, 

1949-1950 Season 18 

Tobacco Warehouses, Floor Space and Operators 

by Markets, 1949 19 

North Carolina Tobacco Laws 26 

State Cigarette Taxes as of August, 1949 29 

City and County Cigarette Taxes 30 









THE BULLETIN 

of the 

North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

L. Y. Ballentine, Commissioner 

Number 119 April, 1950 



Marketing Flue-Cured Tobacco 

By W. P. Hedrick and J. H. Cyrus 

Tobacco Marketing Specialists 
North Carolina Department of Agriculture 

The marketing of tobacco at loose-leaf auction sales is a system 
that has developed to a very high point of efficiency in North 
Carolina during the last 50 or 60 years. The transition from 
closed-bid hogshead markets to loose-leaf auction markets was 
favorably accepted and encouraged by growers and buyers since 
it shortened the channels from the farm to the manufacturer 
and reduced marketing costs. 

The auction system gives the buyers a greater opportunity to 
evaluate and select tobacco best suited for their particular manu- 
facturing needs. It enables buyers to obtain large uniform 
quantities more economically, and it gives manufacturers and 
dealers a better opportunity to redry and prize their purchases 
before damaging. 

The auction system has proven, through the years, to be a 
very satisfactory way to market tobacco. Through competitive 
bidding growers can be assured of getting the highest possible 
price for tobacco properly prepared for market. 

North Carolina farmers, by growing and marketing quality 
tobacco, have established themselves as the world's leading pro- 
ducers of flue-cured leaf. But, during the war years, when there 
was a great demand and keen competition for tobacco, buyers 
became lax in their inspection and appraisal of lots of tobacco on 
the warehouse floor, and many farmers, quick to observe this 
practice, sacrificed quality for quantity. The demand has now 
reached a more stabilized condition, and the competition is not as 
strong. Therefore, in order to maintain their reputation as pro- 
ducers of fine quality tobacco, farmers must give more and more 
attention to qualities demanded by manufacturers and care 
should be taken in sorting, grading and tying before it reaches 
the warehouse where it is sold. 

For a considerable period of time North Carolina tobacco de- 
pended mainly on export outlets for a market, but as domestic 
industry expanded and consumer preference slowly changed from 
dipping snuff and chewing tobacco to smoking cigarettes, local 
manufacturers began to take larger and larger shares of the leaf 




produced. In recent years about 65 to 70 per cent of North Caro- 
lina's tobacco has been used domestically. About 90 per cent of 
the tobacco purchased by domestic manufacturers is used in 
making cigarettes. In 1949 cigarette output reached an all time 
high of about 392 billion, as compared with 387 billion in 1948, 
and 370 billion in 1947. The yearly average for 1935-39 was only 
165 billion cigarettes. 

While domestic use of flue-cured tobacco has increased sharply 
in the last 10 years, due in large part to the increased consump- 
tion of cigarettes, the export trade has decreased in many of the 
foreign countries since the war because of a dollar shortage. Many 
of our dollar short export consumers are substituting foreign 
grown flue-cured tobacco which is cheaper, but is of an inferior 
quality compared with North Carolina flue-cured. So it is safe 
to assume that North Carolina tobacco will still be in fairly 
strong demand, owing to the availability of supplies and high 
quality. However, even further improvement of quality is im- 
portant to holding markets. 

Properly handling tobacco for market requires more knowledge 
and skill than any other agricultural crop grown. The wise grower 
will get ahead by taking advantage of all the available informa- 
tion and services rendered by his agricultural workers. The fol- 



lowing suggestions will be helpful to the grower in commanding 
the best market price for his tobacco crop. 

Suggestions for Profit 

1. Tobacco should be in proper order or case before removing 
it from the barn and packing it in the packhouse, also, before 
sorting is begun. The leaves contain the proper amount of mois- 
ture when they are pliable enough to be handled without break- 
ing, but will rustle or rattle when the stick bearing them is 
shaken. If handled too dry, injury will result from breaking or 
crumbling and, on the other hand, if the leaves contain too much 
moisture, injury will result from discoloration and bruising or 
from damage in the bulk, thus, decreasing its value on the sales 
floor. 

2. Proper light is very essential to carefully sort tobacco. In- 
direct daylight is the minimum requirement to distinguish colors 
in tobacco; however, if natural light is used, a north light is 
preferable. The most modern lighting arrangement for sorting 
tobacco is the flourescent light. A fluorescent lamp with 40 or 45 
watt "daylight" bulbs gives the same, soft, evenly distributed 
light any time of the day or night. It is the best known light for 
distinguishing tobacco colors. Tobacco can even be sorted at night 
under flourescence. The grower should use the same precautions 
in sorting his tobacco that the buyer does in buying. If tobacco 
is properly sorted in a well-lighted grading room, it will have a 
good appearance on a well-lighted warehouse floor. 

3. Tobacco should not be sorted into any more grades than 
are absolutely necessary. A large number of grades are recognized 
in flue-cured tobacco, but not all of these grades are to be found 
in the average crop in sufficient quantities to justify complete 
separation in sorting. Most barns, under normal cropping condi- 
tions, can be divided easily into three or four grades. Average 
size piles command more respect from buyers than a number of 
small lots ; however, uniformity should not be sacrificed for size. 

4. Foreign matter is very objectionable in tobacco and should 
be removed when sorting. Price cuts are usually always. made on 
piles of tobacco containing strings, straw, feathers, and other 
foreign matter. 

5. Color separation in sorting is much more important than 
many farmers realize, especially in dividing lemon and orange 
colors. The lemon color leaves are thinner than the orange tobacco. 



Most domestic companies prefer lemon color tobacco, whereas, 
foreign companies lean to the orange colors. Therefore, when the 
colors are mixed a certain amount of bidding competition is lost 
on the sales floor. Off-colors should never be mixed with true 
colors. 

6. The group division in the sorting of tobacco is of major 
importance, and each group should be separated. Tobacco grows 
on the stalk in a certain order — the thin leaves or lugs near the 
ground; medium bodied leaves or cutters in the middle; heavy 
bodied tobacco or leaf and tips at the top. These divisions are 
known as groups. Since the crop is harvested by priming the 
leaves from the stalk in several separate primings, the crop in a 
large part is automatically separated into the major groups — 
lugs, cutters, and leaf. For this reason, sorting is simplified by 
keeping the different primings separate. Each group is used for 
a different purpose in the manufacture of tobacco products, and 
when mixed it hurts the sales value of the particular lot or pile 
of tobacco. 

7. Length of leaves, where the quality is uniform, is a very 
important factor in sorting leaf grades. Long leaf tobacco of any 
given grade will usually command a higher price than short leaf 
tobacco of the same grade. Leaf grades should be sorted accord- 
ing to length, quality and color. When sorting lugs or primings, 
length is of minor importance, except where there is too much 
difference in the length to give uniformity of appearance. Tobacco 
can always be made uniform in length by folding the stem of the 
long leaves back in the hand before it is tied. 

8. Neat and carefully tied bundles bring a premium on the 
sales floor. Tobacco being sold at the auction is naturally sold 
somewhat on appearance and the neater the hand or bundle the 
more appeal it has to the buyer. The hand or bundle should con- 
tain from 16 to 20 leaves with a tie-leaf from the same group of 
like quality and color. Bundles should never be capped or the tie- 
leaf extended over the end of the stems because tobacco, after 
leaving the sales floor, is redried by heat and capping prevents 
the heat. from penetrating the "butt" and thoroughly drying the 
stems. 

9. After sorting, grading and tying, the bundles are hung on 
the tobacco sticks and bulked down. Bulking under proper condi- 
tions usually improves the quality of tobacco. In most cases, 
green leaves left in bulk for considerable time in proper order 

8 



will lose much of the green color which is objectionable to the 
tobacco trade. If the tobacco is left in the bulk for several days 
heating can be prevented, if tobacco is in proper order, by placing 
two tobacco sticks on each stick of tobacco as it is bulked down 
in a square bulk with all the heads turned to the outside. The 
stick will help carry the heat to the outside. Pressing flue-cured 
tobacco generally is not recommended since it gives the tobacco 
a heavy, leafy appearance, and the demand is for thin, luggy 
tobacco. The weight of the tobacco in bulk is usually sufficient 
if it is packed smoothly. 

10. Tobacco should be neatly packed on the baskets in the 
warehouse. As stated before, tobacco is sold at auction somewhat 
on appearance. Tobacco smoothly arranged on the basket will 
command more attention from the graders and buyers than 
poorly packed, roughly handled tobacco. Covering the piles before 
the sales is a good practice as it prevents the leaves from becom- 
ing too dry and brittle, also, it prevents bleaching if the tobacco 
stays on the floor very long. The arrangement of piles on the 
floor is of some importance. The general practice followed by the 
best growers is to put the tobacco on the floor in consecutive 
order from the best to the lowest grade so the buyers will reach 
the best grade first. 

Know your tobacco, sort and grade it properly, offer it for sale 
when it is in the best condition for market, and follow the market 
reports through your Market News Service and daily paper. 

Tobacco Inspection, Demonstration and Market News Service 

The United States standard grades for tobacco are for the 
benefit of the farmers. The private grades used by manufacturers 
and dealers are for their own use, and their descriptions and 
specifications are usually known only to themselves. Farmers who 
wish to sort and market tobacco according to a definite system 
should become familiar with the Government Standards. 

The tobacco inspection service is maintained by the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture to provide a measuring stick for quality 
and price in order that the growers may protect themselves 
against loss in the sale of their tobacco. In other words, it lets 
the farmer know whether the price offered is right or whether 
it is too low according to market prices. Grading service is avail- 
able on all designated markets, and each lot of tobacco on those 
markets requires a government grade before it can be sold. The 



grade is marked on the upper right-hand corner of the ware- 
house ticket where it can be seen by all, and it becomes the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture tobacco inspection certificate for that 
pile of tobacco. 

Demonstrations are offered as a service to acquaint farmers 
with the objects of the inspection and market news. Also, farmers 
are instructed in preparing tobacco for market so that it can be 
sold for the highest market price. 

The tobacco market news reports issued daily by the U. S. 
and N. C. Departments of Agriculture show the support price 
under the Government Loan Program and the average auction 
price at the time the report is issued. With this information every 
farmer can know when his tobacco is selling in line with the 
market, grade by grade. 



Key to Standard Grade Marks for Flue-Cured Tobacco 

Groups Qualities 

Wrappers 



A- 

B— Leaf 

H — Smoking Leaf 

C — Cutters 

X — Lugs 

P — Primings 

N — Nondescript 



1 — Choice 
2 — Fine 
3— Good 
4— Fair 
5 — Low 
6 — Common 



Color 

L — Lemon 

F — Orange 

R— Red 

D— Dark Red 

G — Green 

G — (L) Thinnest Green 

G — (F) Medium-bodied Green 

G — (R) Heaviest Green 

Example: B4L designates leaf, fair quality and lemon color. 



Special Factors 
V — Greenish 
M — Mixed 
K — Variegated 
W — Unsafe Order 
U — Unsound 



10 



Tobacco Summary - 1949 

In 1949 North Carolina produced 65 per cent of all the flue- 
cured tobacco grown in the United States, and marketed 64.7 per 
cent of the 1,112,168,000 pounds produced. Thus, North Carolina 
lost 0.3 per cent of the 728,380,000 pounds produced in the State 
to out-of-state markets. The total production in North Carolina 
was 2 per cent less in 1949 than it was in 1948, even with a 5 per 
cent increase in acreage, due to a plant shortage and unfavorable 
seasons in the Old and Middle Belts. 

The 1949 final reports from the four flue-cured belts in North 
Carolina show that growers sold a total of 720,205,501 pounds 
of tobacco for $351,473,054, averaging $48.80 per hundred 
pounds. In 1948 growers sold 723,455,189 pounds for $364,708,- 
387, with an average of $50.41 per hundred pounds. 

A breakdown by belts shows that the North Carolina Border 
Belt, Type 13, sold 132,676,010 pounds of producers' tobacco in 
1949, which is an increase of 10 per cent over 1948. The Border 
Belt opened its season on August 2 and final sales were held on 
October 6, 1949. 

Markets in the Eastern Belt, flue-cured Type 12, started sales 
on August 19 and ran through November 18, 1949. During the 
season producers sold 363,413,194 pounds of tobacco, which was 
2.5 per cent above the amount sold in 1948. The Windsor market, 
which had been closed since 1946, reopened in 1949, but closed 
again after about two weeks of operations because of insufficient 
buyers. 

The Middle Belt, flue-cured Type 11B, dropped 13 per cent below 
the 1948 sales of producers' tobacco, selling only 122,517,721 
pounds. Five Middle Belt markets in the sandhills opened August 
29, three days prior to the regular Middle Belt opening on Sep- 
tember 1, 1949. Leggett and Myers' buyers did not appear on 
those early opening markets during the first three clays. Ellerbe, 
which opened with the Border Markets in 1948, opened with the 
Middle Belt in 1949, but had to close after about two weeks be- 
cause of insufficient buyers. The Middle Belt completed its 1949 
season on November 23, 1949. 

The Old Belt, flue-cured type 11 A, opened its markets on 
September 12 and final sales were held December 16, 1949. A 
total of 101,597,578 pounds of farmers' tobacco was sold during 

11 



the season, which is 7 per cent less than the 1948 sales. Greens- 
boro opened as a market in 1949 after a lapse of 28 years. 

The North Carolina Burley Belt, light air-cured, Type 31, 
started sales on its three markets located at Asheville, Boone, 
and West Jefferson on November 28, 1949, and final sales were 
held January 20, 1950. The Burley producers marketed a total 
of 13,650,674 pounds of tobacco for $5,920,000, giving them an 
average of $43.37 per hundred pounds. This is 17 per cent less 
than the 16,106,762 pounds sold in 1948 for $7,518,425 which 
averaged $46.68 per hundred pounds. 



12 



Tobacco Marketed by North Carolina Producers and 
Yield Per Acre 



Year 



Yield Per Acre 
(Pounds) 



Production 
(1.000 lbs.) 



Value 
(1,000 Dollars) 



Average 
Price 



Flue-Cured 1919-1949 



1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946^ 

1947 

1948 

1949 



639 
696 
632 
592 

746 
560 
713 
710 
775 
707 
665 
757 
692 
624 
794 
847 
935 
765 
883 
844 
964 

1,038 
928 

1,052 
935 

1,077 

1,100 

1,139 
1,245 
1,187 



319,276 
423,703 
246,540 
271,170 
396.354 
276,819 
373,352 
378,274 
482,782 
493,132 
484,630 
581,200 
476,382 
288,750 
530,133 
412,055 
572,625 
451,975 
595,815 
509,470 
812,540 
516,835 
452.825 
566,810 
542,200 
736,990 
794,310 

892,205~ 
739,380 

728,380 



$157,340 

88,271 

60,402 

74,572 

81,998 

62,597 

83,756 

96,762 

100,414 

93.450 

89,470 

74,733 

42,024 

34,949 

85,530 

117,999 

116,418 

101,856 

143,058 

115,428 

123.893 

85,792 

132,291 

221,538 

219,074 

317,628 

349,148 

45-Ufi39_ 

374,513 
372,647 
355,449 



$49.20 
20.80 
24.50 
27.50 
20.70 
22.60 
22.40 
25.60 
20.80 
19.00 
18.50 
12.90 
8.80 
12.10 
16.10 
28.60 
20.30 
22.50 
24.00 
22.70 
15.20 
16.60 
29.20 
39.10 
40.40 
43.10 
44.00 

_49L5 
42.00 
50.40 
48.80 



Burley Light Air-Cured 1934-1949 



1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 



870 


4,785 


925 


4.810 


900 


5,400 


975 


8,775 


900 


7,740 


1,070 


8,667 


1,050 


6,825 


1,075 


6,665 


1,150 


7,590 


1,225 


10,412 


1,390 


16,680 


1,500 


19,500 


1,475 


14,455 


1.560 


14. '.17 6 


1,680 


17,304 


1,550 


16,740 



809 


17.50 


1,025 


21.30 


2,095 


38.80 


1,878 


21.40 


1,308 


16.90 


1,447 


16.70 


1,242 


18.20 


2,093 


31.40 


3,211 


42.30 


5,102 


49.00 


8,157 


48.90 


7,46S 


38.30 


5^999 ___ 
6,335 


^L.50 
42.30 


7.800 


46.60 


5,920 


43.37 







13 



North Carolina 1950 Flue-Cured Tobacco Allotments 



County Number of Farms 

Alamance 1.354 

Alexander 971 

Anson 184 

Beaufort 2.619 

Bertie 1 ,626 

Bladen 3.318 

Brunswick 1,660 

Burke 1 

Caldwell 246 

Camden 2 

Carteret 448 

Caswell 1 ,934 

Catawba 5 

Chatham 1,1 88 

Chowan 184 

Cleveland 1 

Columbus 5,341 

Craven 1,869 

Cumberland 2,406 

Currituck 1 

Davidson 1,698 

Davie 956 

Duplin 4,574 

Durham 1,102 

Edgecombe 1,563 

Forsyth 2,255 

Franklin 2,847 

Gaston 8 

Gates 116 

Granville 2,104 

Greene 1,136 

Guilford 3,214 

Halifax 2,063 

Harnett 3,624 

Hertford 1,027 

Hoke 929 

Hyde 8 

Iredell 801 

Johnston 5,764 

Jones 940 

Lee 1,334 

Lenoir 1,898 

Martin 1,634 

Mecklenburg 11 

Montgomei-y 380 

Moore 1,459 

Nash 3,003 

New Hanover 61 

Northampton 169 

Onslow 1,852 

Orange 960 

Pamlico 443 

Pasquotank 1 

Pender 1,461 

Perquimans 2 

Person 1,693 

Pitt 2,753 

Randolph 1,714 



Acres 

6,413.7 

1,955.9 

440.3 

12,875.2 

7,658.0 

9.909.8 

4,313.2 

0.3 

622.2 

5.2 

1,812.5 

12,477.7 

6.6 

4,246.5 

727.9 

2.0 

21,765.4 

11,512.8 

6,932.7 

5.4 

4,721.5 

1,912.1 

20.534.2 

5.389.4 

15.619.6 

7,186.8 

15,480.0 

7.0 

347.6 

17,928.5 

16,315.4 

12,703.5 

7,858.6 

12.305.1 

4,367.1 

3,701.2 

8.7 

1,744.6 

30,590.5 

7,353.8 

5,519.2 

18,870.5 

11,523.5 

5.2 

1,204.9 

6,047.1 

24,657.5 

182.3 

538.4 

8,406.6 

4,575.2 

1,430.5 

1.6 

4,213.0 

3.1 

12,933.0 

34,339.5 

4,592.2 



14 



County Number of Farms Acres 

Richmond 900 2,613.0 

Robeson 4,729 27,609.0 

Rockingham 3,042 17,788.1 

Rowan 33 76.9 

Sampson 5,733 20,435.4 

Scotland 419 1,435.5 

Stokes 2,787 15,549.8 

Surry 3,211 14,803.5 

Tyrrel 1 1.2 

Vance 1,548 11,048.7 

Wake 3,911 26,185.9 

Warren 1,917 8,241.7 

Washington 290 1,306.8 

Wayne 3,059 19,577.8 

Wilkes 913 2,042.8 

Wilson 2,156 22,727.5 

Yadkin 2,691 10,983.2 



STATE TOTAL 120,254 638,223.5 



15 



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Summary of Dealer and Warehouse Resales 
1949-1950 Season 



POUNDS 



Resales 



Gross 



DOLLARS 



Resales 



Gross 



13,136,981 



42,615,749 



Border Belt— Type 13 

Dealers 5,946,520 

Warehouse 7,190,461 

Eastern Belt— Type 12 

Dealers 14,217,163 

Warehouse 28,398,586 

Middle Belt— Type 11-B 

Dealers 6,756,630 

Warehouse 7,704,876 

Old Belt— Type 11-A 

Dealers 5,585,010 

Warehouse 6.346,155 

Burley Belt— Type 31 

Dealers 1,505,430 

Warehouse 2,044,438 



14,461,506 



11,931,165 



2,374,130 
3,378,536 



5,347,300 
13,500,439 



2,483,035 
3,481,192 



2,093,755 
2,803,241 



667,914 
902,105 



$ 5,752,666 



$18,847,739 



$ 5,964,227 



$ 4,896,996 



3,549,868 



$ 1,570,019 



18 



List of Tobacco Warehouses, Floor Space and 
Operators by Markets — 1949 

Chadbourn (One set buyers) 175,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Carters No. 1 & 2— L. C. Tillery, W. F. Rogers 
Meyers — J. H. Harper, J. B. Hendley 
New Brick— W. C. Coates & Sons, Fred Nobles 

Clarkton (One set buyers) 152,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Banner — B. F. Rivenback, J. H. Bryant 

Big L— C. J. Fleming, E. C. Huff, C. B. Turner, L. B. Wilkenson 
Big 5— C. J. Fleming, E. C. Huff, C. B. Turner, L. B. Wilkenson 
Brick— C. J. Fleming, E. C. Huff, C. B. Turner, L. B. Wilkenson 
Farmers — B. F. Rivenback, J. H. Bryant 

Fair Bluff (One set buyers) 125,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Planters— N. N. Love, W. M. Talley, Carl Mears 
Powells— A. H., B. A. Powell, A. L. Carver, A. H. Powell, Jr. 
Dixie — Don B. Watson, R. B. Frazier 
Graingers — N. N. Love, W. M. Talley, Carl Mears 

Fairmont (Four sets buyers) 1,206,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Big 5— E. J. Chambers, A. O. Reeves, A. E. Garrett, M. C. Yarboro 

Big Brick— F. P. Joyce, J. A. Pell 

Davis-Mitchell — F. A. Davis, Harry and Jack Mitchell 

Farmers — F. P. Joyce, J. A. Pell 

Holliday— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday, G. Ferry 

Frye No. 1 & 2— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday, G. Ferry 

Dixie— E. H. Frye, J. W. and J. M. Holliday, G. Ferry 

Peoples — A. D. Reeves, E. J. Chambers, A. E. Garrett, M. C. Yarboro 

Planters No. 1 & 2— N. Tuck, Alley and W. L. Best, G. R. Royster, M. 

Daniels 
Robeson County — A. O. Reeves, E. J. Chambers, A. E. Garrett, M. C. 

Yarboro 
Square Deal No. 1 & 2— W. G. Bassett 
Star-Carolina No. 1, 2, & 3— Dick Booker, C. A. Blankenship, G. N. 

Herring, I. A. and W. L. Barefoot 
Twin States— P. R. Floyd, Jr., R. J. Harris, Paul Wilson 

Fayetteville (One set buyers) 340,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Big Farmers— R. H. Barbour, S. T. Proctor, P. Campbell 
Wellons — J. W. Stephenson, Carl Adams 

Lumberton (Three sets buyers) 581,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Britts— Wyatt Chaffin, Paul C. Edmund, III 
Carolina No. 1 & 2 — A. Forbs, M. Roycroft, J. E. Johnson, L. Townsend, 

A. McCrae 
Dixie No. 1 & 2— H. A. McKeithan, J. A. Kinlaw, E. K. Biggs 
Hedgepeth No. 2 — J. Roycroft, R. A. Hedgepeth, H. Hick, L. Rollins 

19 



Liberty No. 2— R. E. Wilkens, E. S. White 
Smith No. 1 & 2— T. J. Smith, Paul Sands 

Tabor City (One set buyers) 194,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Carolina-Farmers — Mrs. Harriet Sikes, R. C. and Joe Coleman 
Garrell's— G. T. and C. E. Walden 
Planters — Don Watson 

Whiteville (Three sets buyers) 475,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Brooks — H. L. Motley and Clair Motley 
Crutchfield — Gaither and Raymond Crutchfield 
Farmers — A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 
Lea's No. 1 & 2 — Wm. Townes Lea, L. Love 
Moores — A. H. Moore 
Nelsons — John H. Nelson 

Perkins & Newman — Bill and L. H. Perkins, H. Newman 
Planters No. 1 & 2— A. O. King, Jr., J. W. Peay 
Tuggles— A. Dial Gray, J. L. Neal 

Ahoskie (One set buyers) 113,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Basnight No. 1 & 2 — Lyman Wilkens, H. Veasey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— E. R. Evans, W. D. Odem 

Clinton (One set buyers) 373,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Bass — Taft Bass, Hubert Carr 

Big Sampson— Z. D. McWhorter, E. Bass, G. S. Strickland 
Carolina— Z. D. McWhorter, E. Bass, G. S. Strickland 
Center Brick — Guy R. Ross 
Farmers No. 2 — Taft Bass, Hubert Car 
Ross No. 2 — Guy R. Ross 

Dunn (One set buyers) 351,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Farmers — J. R. Owens, D. W. Worthington 
Growers — J. R. Owens, D. W. Worthington 
New Big — Buck and Hank Currin 
Old Big — Buck and Hank Currin 

Farmville (Two sets buyers) 408,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Bells— L. R. Bell & Sons, C. C. Ivey & Bros. 
Farmers — Fountain & Webb 
Fountains — Fountain & Webb 

Monks No. 1 & 2— J. Y. Monk, R. D. Rouse, J. C. Carlton 
Planters — Moye, Worthington & Harris 

Goldsboro (One set buyers) 312,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Carolina — S. G. Best, B. Smith, J. Musgrave 

Farmers No. 1 & 2— S. B. and J. F. Hill, H. Benton, C. Hollemon 
Planters — J. R. Musgrave 
Tin— O. L. Littleton 
Victory — J. B. Scott, J. Hopewell, P. Bridgers, R. Smith 

20 



Greenville (Five sets buyers) 1,478,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Cannon — W. T. Cannon, Carlton Dail 
Dixie — M. D. Lassiter 

Farmers — H. H. Jasper, June, Arthur Tripp 
Smith & Suggs No. 1 & 2— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 
Star No. 1 & 2— B. B. Suggs, G. V. Smith 
Growers — Woodrow Worthington 
Harris-Rogers No. 2 — R. E. Rogers, R. E. Harris 
Keels— R. V. and J. T. Keel 
McGowans No. 1 & 2— C. H. McGowan 
Morton Empire — W. Z. Morton 

New Carolina No. 1 & 2 — Floyd McGowan, L. W. Edwards 
Victory — Gus and H. Forbes, O. L. Joyner, Jr. 

Kinston (Four sets buyers) 1,336,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Brooks — J. R. and C. B. Brooks 
Central — W. I. and Henry Herring 
Eagle — Percy Holden, Mgr. 
Farmers — J. T. Jenkins, L. E. Pollock 
Kinston Coop. Whse. — G. F. Loftin, Pres. 
Knotts Whse, Inc.— K. W. Loftin 

Knotts New— H. G. and Geo. W. Knott, Jr., W. Brewer 
New Carolina — Percy Holden, Mgr. 
New Dixie — W. M. Wickham 
Planters — Norman Hardee, Mgr. 
Sheppards No. 1 & 2 — R. E. Sheppard 
Tapps — H. F. Laws 
The Star Whse.— C. J. Herring 

Robersonville (One set buyers) 190,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Planters No. 1 & 2— E. G. Anderson, H. T. Highsmith 
Adkins & Bailey — R. K. Adkins, I. M. Little, Jas. and Chas. Gray, 

J. W. Peay 
Central-New Red Front — R. K. Adkins, I. M. Little, Jas. and Chas. Gray, 

J. W. Peay 

Rocky Mount (Four sets buyers) 965,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Cobb & Foxhall No. 1 & 2— W. E. Cobb, H. P. Foxhall 
Fenners No. 1 & 2 — Julian B. Fenner 
Planters No. 1, 2, & 3 — Bernard Faulkner, Mgr. 
Easley No. 1, .2, & 3— H. A. Easley 
Farmers— T. A. Williams, Pres. 
Mangum No. 1 & 2 — Roy Phipps 
Smith No. 1 & 2— James D. Smith 
Works Whse.— R. J. Works 

Smithfield (Two sets buyers) 572,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Perkins-Riverside — N. L. Perkins, Jr. 

Wallace No. 1, 2, & 3 — Lawrance, Dixon and Holton Wallace 
Farmers Tob. Whse. — W. L. Kennedy, M. L. Daughtery, G. G. Adams 
Goldleaf— R. A. Pearce 

21 



Big Planters, Inc.— W. A. Carter, Mgr. 

Dixie Growers No. 2, Inc. — J. J. Broadhurst, Jr. 

Tarboro (One set buyers) 135,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Clarks No. 1 & 2— H. I. Johnson, S. A. McConkey 
Farmers No. 1 & 2— W. L. House, J. P. Bunn, W. A. Gardner 
Victory No. 1 & 2 — W. E. Simmons, C. Weeks, J. and W. L. Leggett 

Wallace (One set buyers) 320,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Hussey No. 1 & 2— J. H. Bryant, W. L. Hussey, G. Bennett 
New Duplin — A. E. Rackley, J. A. Chestnut 
Blanchard & Farrior — O. C. Blanchard, W. H.. Farrior 

Washington (One set buyers) 203,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Gravely's— H. C. Gravely & Sons 
Sermons No. 1 & 2 — J. E. Roberson, W. J. Sermon 
Knotts— L. E. Knott 

Wendell (Two sets buyers) 232,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Banners No. 1 & 2— F. Harris, J. W. Dale, Jr., I. B. Medlin, Bailey 

Farmers — L. R. Clark & Son 

Northside — J. H. Sands, G. Dean, E. Price 

Planters — J. I. Lynch, D. W. Arnold 

Producers Coop. — Ronald Hocutt, Mgr. 

Star A & B— J. S. Bernard, C. Walker, G. Whitehurst 

Williamston (One set buyers) 180,000 sq. ft. floor space 

New Carolina— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
New Farmers— S. C. Griffin, H. L. Barnhill, J. B. Taylor, E. Lilley 
Planters — C. Langley, J. W. Gurkin, & Rogers 
Roanoke-Dixie — Rogers, Gurkins, Langley 

Wilson (Five sets buyers) 1,532,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Banner — A. W. Fleming & Son 
Big Dixie— E. B. Hicks, W. C. Thomas, R. P. Dew 
Big Star — J. J. Gibbons 

Carolina — Geo. L. Wainwright, J. C. Burton 
Center Brick No. 1, 2, & 3— Cozart & Eagles Co. 
Clark— W. B. Clark & Sons 
Farmers — Dew, Dean, Hicks, Thomas 
Growers Coop. — W. O. Harris, Mgr. 
New Planters No. 1 & 2— R. T. Smith, S. W. and P. W. Carr, H. W. 

Anderson 
Smith Sales Co. A, B. C— H. H. Harriss, Jr. 
Wainwrights — G. L. Wainwright, J. B. Braton 
Watson No. 1 & 2— R. T. Smith, S. W. and P. W. Carr, H. W. Anderson 

^Windsor (Did not have full set buyers) 45,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Farmers — J. Farrow Hicks 

*Closed after about two weeks of operation due to insufficient buyers. 

22 



Aberdeen (One set buyers) 74,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Aberdeen — D. W. Worthington, Lloyd Mills 
Carters No. 1 & 2— D. W. Worthington, Lloyd Mills 
Planters — Gene Maynard, Bill Maurer 

Carthage (One set buyers) 585,000 sq. ft. floor space 
McConnells— O. L. Littleton, W. N. Carter 
Smothers No. 1 & 2 — R. D. Smothers and R. D. Smothers, Jr. 

Durham (Three sets buyers) 521,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Liberty — Stone Bros. & Roberts 
Mangum — S. T. Mangum 
Planters— J. M. Talley 

Roycroft— M. A., J. K., H. T. Roycroft, J. C. Currin 
Star-Brick— A. L. Carver, C. H. and W. W. Cozart, W. L. Currin 

Fuquay-Varina (Two sets buyers) 398,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Central No. 1 & 2— P. L. Campbell, S. T. Proctor, R. H. Barbour 
New Deal No. 1 & 2— King Roberts 
Planters— W. M., R. B., A. L. Talley 
Talley Bros.— W. M., R. B., A. L. Talley 
Varina-Brick — J. C. Adams, J. W. Stephenson 

*Ellerbe (Did not have full set buyers) 65,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Farmers — Geo. Mabe, Bob Newsom 
Richmond County — Bill Simpson, R. E. Holcomb 

Henderson (Two sets buyers) 394,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Banner— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, L. B. Wilkinson, E. C. Huff 

Carolina— W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster, A. H. Moore 

Coopers— W. B. Daniel, F. S. Royster, A. H. Moore 

Farmers — W. J. Alston 

High Price— C. J. Fleming, C. B. Turner, L. B. Wilkinson, E. C. Huff 

Liberty — G. T. Robertson & Son 

Planters— W. J. Alston & Son, N. B. Tuck 

Louisburg (One set buyers) 74,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Planters — A. N. Wilson 
Southside— C. E. Ford 
Union — G. C. Harris, N. F. Freeman 

Oxford (Two sets buyers) 351,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Banner-Mitchell— W. L. Mitchell 

Farmers-Mangum — J. C. Adcock, S. T. Currin, T. B. Williams 
Fleming No. 1 & 2— D. T. Currin, G. B. Watkins, H. G. Taylor 
Johnson — C. R., J. R. and S. J. Watkins 

Owen No. 1 & 2 — Gregory, Watkins, Royster, Pleasants, Goode 
Planters— C. R., J. R. and S. J. Watkins 

Sanford (One set buyers) 156,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Farmers Flag— C. W. Puckett, F. L. McCollum 
Hancock — Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 



23 



Big Sanford— Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 
Wilkens— Joe M. Wilkens, G. T. Hancock 
Wood 3-W— W. F. Wood 

Warrenton (One set buyers) 97,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Boyd's— W. P. Burwell 
Center— R. K. Carroll 
Currins — D. G. Currin 
Farmers — E. G. Tarwater 

Burlington (One set buyers) 96,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Carolina— R. D. Tickle, W. D. Florence, J. G. McCray, F. D. Coble 
Coble — Norwood Newman, Elton Hughes, H. L. Johnson 
Farmers — Odell King, Jack McCauley, R. W. Rainey 

Madison (One set buyers) 124,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Big Star— S. F. Webster, R. T. Chilton, H. A. Fagg 
Carolina— T. R. Preston, N. C. and R. G. Angel 
New Brick— S. F. Webster, R. T. Chilton 
Planters— J. R. Sharpe, W. S. Smith, J. R. Price 
Sharpe & Smith— J. R. Sharpe, W. S. Smith, J. R. Price 

Mebane (One set buyers) 105,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Farmers — J. T. Hensley & Sons 

Piedmont— J. D. Wood, J. F. McCauley, I. C. Fairabow 
Planters— W. J. Dillard, J. B. Keck & Warren 

Mt. Airy (One set buyers) 158,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Liberty — E. V. Dearmin and D. G. Smith 
Nichols — R. F. and Fox Nichols, W. H. Brown 
Planters & Jones — Tom and Frank Jones, Buck White 
Va. -Carolina-Simmons — R. C. Simmons, Sr. 

Reidsville (One set buyers) 225,000 sq. ft. floor space 

Browns— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMichael, R. Roberts, D. Huffines 
Farmers— G. E. Smith, P. D. McMachael, R. Roberts, D. Huffines 
Leader — A. P. Sands, A. G. Irvin, J. L. Pinnix 
Smothers — T. B. Smothers 
Watts— A. G. Irvin, A. P. Sands, Jr. 

Roxboro (One set buyers) 147,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Farmers — Lindsay Wagstaff, R. L. Hester 

Hyco — Geo. Walker, F. J. Hester, W. R. Jones and R. W. Lunsford 
Pioneer— H. N. Winstead, Jr., J. H. Merritt, D. L. Whitfield 
Planters No. 1 & 2— T. O. Pass 
Winstead— T. T. and Elmo Mitchell 

Stoneville (One set buyers) 84,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Browns — O. P. Joyce, Roy Carter 
Farmers — F. A. Brown, Percy Moorefield 
Piedmont — G. D. Rakestraw, J. J. Webster 
Slates— B. R., B. M., C. A., and J. O. Slate 

24 



Winston-Salem (Four sets buyers) 650,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Browns — R. W. Newsome, W. B. Simpson 
Carolina — H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 
Dixie— W. G. Sheets, J. Pell, Floyd Joyce 
Farmers — W. G. Sheets, J. Pell, Floyd Joyce 

Glenn & Banner— S. H. Price, C. T. Glenn, D. L. Harris, C. H. Dalton, Jr. 
Liberty — M. M. Joyner, R. T. Carter, R. F. Carter 
Pepper No. 1 & 2— F. D. Pepper 
Piedmont— B. E. Cock, C. B. Strickland 
Planters— H. M. Bouldin, G. H. Robertson 
Taylors No. 1 & 2— Paul Taylor 

Greensboro (Did not have full set buyers) 100,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Greensboro Tob. Whse. Co. R. C. Coleman, Mgr. 

Asheville (One set buyers) 425,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Carolina — Farmers Federation, Max Roberts, Mgr. 
Farmers — Farmers Federation, Max Robei'ts, Mgr. 
Dixie No. 1 & 2— Taft Bass 

Planters No. 1 & 2— J. W. Stewart, Fred D. Cockfield 
Bernard-Walker No. 1 & 2— Jas. E. Walker, Mgr. 
Haneys & Walker — Jas. E. Walker, Mgr. 

Boone (One set buyers) 

Mountain Burley No. 1 & 2— R. C. Coleman 
Farmers Burley — R. C. Coleman 

West Jefferson (One set buyers) 90,000 sq. ft. floor space 
Tri-State Burley— C. C. and Rex Taylor 
Planters — Bill Maurer 



25 



North Carolina Tobacco Laws 

Chapter 106 of the General Statutes 

Article 39. Leaf Tobacco Warehouses 

§ 106-452. Maximum warehouse charges. — The charges and expenses of 
handling and selling leaf tobacco upon the floor of tobacco warehouses shall 
not exceed the following schedule of prices, viz.: For auction fees, fifteen 
cents on all piles of one hundred pounds or less, and twenty-five cents on 
all piles over one hundred pounds for weighing and handling, ten cents per 
pile for all piles less than one hundred pounds, for all piles over one hundred 
pounds at the rate of ten cents per hundred pounds; for commissions on the 
gross sales of leaf tobacco in said warehouses, not to exceed two and one- 
half per centum: Provided, that tobacco warehouses selling burley tobacco 
only may charge commissions on the gross sales of burley leaf tobacco not 
to exceed four per centum. (Rev., s. 3042, 1895, c. 81; 1941, c. 291; C. S. 
5124.) 

§ 106-453. Oath of tobacco weigher. — All leaf tobacco sold upon the floor 
of any tobacco warehouse shall first be weighed by some reliable person, 
who shall have first sworn and subscribed to the following oath, to wit: "I 
do solemnly swear (or affiirm) that I will correctly and accurately weigh 

all tobacco offered for sale at the warehouse of , 

and correctly test and keep accurate the scales upon which the tobacco so 
offered for sale is weighed." Such oath shall be filed in the office of the clerk 
of the superior court of the county in which said warehouse is situated. 
(Rev., s. 3043; 1895, c. 81, s 2; C. S. 5125.) 

§ 106-454. Warehouse proprietor to render bill of charges; penalty. — The 

proprietor of each and every warehouse shall render to each seller of tobacco 
at his warehouse a bill plainly stating the amount charged for weighing and 
handling, the amount charged for auction fees, and the commission charged 
on such sale, and it shall be unlawful for any other charges or fees to be 
made or accepted. For each and every violation of the provisions of this 
article a penalty of ten dollars may be recovered by any one injured thereby. 
(Rev., s. 3044; 1895, c. 81, ss. 3, 4; C. S. 5126.) 

§ 106-455. Tobacco purchases to be paid for by cash or check to order. — The 

proprietor of each and every warehouse shall pay for all tobacco sold in said 
warehouse either in cash or by giving to the seller a check payable to his 
order in his full name or in his surname and initials and it shall be unlawful 
to use any other method. Every person, firm or corporation violating the pro- 
visions hereof shall, in addition to any and all civil liability which may arise 
by law, be guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be 
punishable by fine not exceeding one hundred dollars or imprisonment not 
exceeding thirty days, or both, in the discretion of the court. (1931, c. 101, 
s. 1939, c. 348.) 

Article 40. Leaf Tobacco Sales 

§ 106-456. Accounts of warehouse sales required. — On and after the first 
day of August, one thousand nine hundred and seven, the proprietor of each 

26 



and every leaf tobacco warehouse doing business in this state shall keep 
a correct account of the number of pounds of leaf tobacco sold upon the 
floor of his warehouse daily. (1907, c. 97, s. 1; C. S. 4926.) 

§ 106-457. Monthly reports to commissioner; results classified. — On or 

before the tenth day of each succeeding month the said warehouse pro- 
prietors shall make a statement, under oath, of all the tobacco so sold upon 
the floor of his warehouse during the past month and shall transmit the 
said statement, at once, to the commissioner of agriculture at Raleigh, 
North Carolina. The report so made to the commissioner of agriculture shall 
be so arranged and classified as to show the number of pounds of tobacco 
sold for the producers of tobacco from first hand; the number of pounds sold 
for dealers; and the number of pounds resold by the proprietor of the ware- 
house for his own account or for the account of some other warehouse. (1907, 
c. 97, s. 2; Ex. Sess. 1921, c. 76; C. S. 4927.) 

§ 106-458. Commissioner to keep record and publish in bulletin. — The com- 
missioner of agriculture shall cause said statements to be accurately copied 
into a book to be kept for this purpose, and shall keep separate and apart 
the statements returned to him from each leaf tobacco market in the state, 
so as to show the number of pounds of tobacco sold by each market for the 
sale of leaf tobacco; the number of pounds sold by producers, and the 
number of pounds resold upon each market. The commissioner of agriculture 
shall keep said books open to the inspection of the public, and shall, on or 
before the fifteenth day of each month, after the receipt of the reports above 
required to be made to him on or before the tenth day of each month, cause 
the said reports to be published in the bulletin issued by the agricultural 
department and in one or more journals published in the interest of the 
growth, sale, and manufacture of tobacco in the state, or having a large 
circulation therein. (1907, c. 97, s. 3; Ex. Sess. 1921, c. 76; C. S. 4928.) 

§ 106-461. Nested, shingled or overhung tobacco. — It shall be unlawful 
for any person, firm or corporation to sell or offer for sale, upon any leaf 
tobacco warehouse floor, any pile or piles of tobacco, which are nested, or 
shingled, or overhung, or either as hereinafter defined: 1st. Nesting tobaco: 
That is, so arranging tobacco in the pile offered for sale that it is impossible 
for the buyer thereof to pull leaves from the bottom of such pile for the 
purpose of inspection; 2nd. Shingling tobacco: That is, so arranging a pile 
of tobacco that a better quality of tobacco appears upon the outside and 
tobacco of inferior quality appears on the inside of such pile; and 3rd. Over- 
hanging tobacco: That is, so arranging a pile of tobacco that there are 
alternate bundles of good and sorry tobacco. (1933, c. 467, s. 1.) 

§ 106-462. Sale under name other than that of true owner prohibited. — It 

shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to sell or offer for sale 
or cause to be sold, or offered for sale, any leaf tobacco upon the floors of 
any leaf tobacco warehouse, in the name of any person, firm or corporation, 
other than that of the true owner or owners thereof, which true owner's 
name shall be registered upon the warehouse sales book in which it is being 
offered for sale. (1933, c. 467, s. 2.) 

27 



§ 106-465. Organization and membership of tobacco boards of trade; rules 
and regulations; price fixing prohibited. — Tobacco warehousemen and the 
purchasers of leaf tobacco, at auction, on warehouse floors, are hereby 
authorized to organize, either as non-stock corporations, or voluntary as- 
sociations, tobacco boards of trade in the several towns and cities in North 
Carolina in which leaf tobacco is sold on warehouse floors, at auction. 

Such tobacco boards of trade as may now exist, or which may hereafter 
be organized, are authorized to make reasonable rules and regulations for 
the economical and efficient handling of the sale of leaf tobacco at auction 
on the warehouse floors in the several towns and cities in North Carolina in 
which an auction market is situated. 

The tobacco boards of trade in the several towns and cities in North Caro- 
lina are authorized to require as a condition to membership therein the 
applicants to pay a reasonable membership fee and the following schedule 
of maximum fees shall be deemed reasonable, to-wit: 

A membership fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) in those towns in which less 
than three million pounds of tobacco was sold at auction between the dates 
of August 20, 1931, and May 1, 1932; A fee of one hundred dollars ($100.00) 
in those towns in which during said period of time more than three million 
and less than ten million pounds of tobacco was sold; A fee of one hundred 
fifty dollars ($150.00) in those towns in which during said period of time 
more than ten million and less than twenty-five million pounds of tobacco 
was sold; A fee of three hundred dollars ($300.00) in those towns in which 
during said period of time more than twenty-five million pounds of tobacco 
was sold. 

Membership, in good standing, in a local board of trade shall be deemed 
a reasonable requirement by such board of trade as a condition to partici- 
pating in the business of operating a tobacco warehouse or the purchase of 
tobacco at auction therein. 

It shall be unlawful and punishable as of a misdemeanor for any bidder 
or purchaser of tobacco upon warehouse floors to refuse to take and pay for 
any basket or baskets so bid off from the seller when the seller has or has 
not accepted the price offered by the purchaser or bidder of other baskets. 
That any person suspended or expelled from a tobacco board of trade under 
the provisions of this section may appeal from such suspension to the 
superior court of the county in which said board of trade is located. 

Nothing in this section shall authorize the organization of any associa- 
tion having for its purpose the control of prices or the making of rules and 
regulations in restraint of trade. (1933, c. 268.) 



28 



State Cigarette Taxes as of August, 1949 

1948 Collections 

$ 7,681,000 

2,232,000 



State Rate Per Package 

Alabama 34 .... 

Arizona 24 .... 

Arkansas 44 .... 

Connecticut 3$ .... 

Delaware 2$ 

District of Columbia 14 .... 

Florida 44 .... 

Georgia 54 .... 

Idaho 34 .... 

Illinois 34 . 

Indiana 34 

Iowa 24 

Kansas 34 .... 

Kentucky 24 .... 

Louisiana 84 .... 

Maine 4c' .... 

Massachusetts 44 .... 

Michigan 34 .... 

Minnesota 44 .... 

Mississippi 44 

Montana 24 .... 

Nebraska 34 

Nevada 3$ .... 

New Hampshire 2Vz4 ■ ■ ■ ■ 

New Jersey 34 

New Mexico 44 

New York 34 

North Dakota 5$ 

Ohio 24 

Oklahoma 54 

Pennsylvania 44 

Rhode Island 3^ 

South Carolina 3^ 

South Dakota 3^ 



6,161,000 

7,231,000 

Enacted 1949 

Enacted 1949 
12,584,000 

8,331,000 

1,583,000 
28,168,000 
12,368,000 

4,858,000 

4,499,000 

4,968,000 
13,399,000 

5,114,000 
21,622,000 
22,386,000 

8,290,000 

6,565,000 

1,265,000 

3,881,000 
490,000 

2,076,000 

9,902,000 

1,766,000 
50,872,000 

1,715,000 
17,551,000 

8,110,000 
40,435,000 

2,941,000 

5,630,000 

1,785,000 

29 



Tennessee 34 8,184,000 

Texas 3* 23,148,000 

Utah 24 881,000 

Vermont U 1,033,000 

Washington 24 5,150,000 

West Virginia U 2,130,000 

Wisconsin 3,4 6,717,000 

The states of Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Nevada, New Mexico, 
North Dakota and Pennsylvania increased their tax 14 per package this year. 
The State of Arkansas reduced their tax 24 per package this year. 
The State of Louisiana increased their tax 24 per package this year. 
Many cities and counties have additional taxes of 1 to 2 cents per package. 

City and County Cigarette Taxes 

No Revenue Figures Available to Date 

Jefferson County, Alabama 24 per package 

Mobile County, Alabama 14 per package 

Birmingham, Alabama 24 per package 

Montgomery, Alabama 24 per package 

Denver, Colorado 24 per package 

Miami, Florida 24 per package 

Lakeland, Florida 24 per package 

St. Petersburg, Florida 24 per package 

West Palm Beach, Florida 24 per package 

Baltimore, Maryland, City 14 per package 

Baltimore, Maryland, County 24 per package 

Columbia, Missouri 24 per package 

Jefferson City, Missouri 24 per package 

Kansas City, Missouri 24 per package 

St. Louis, Missouri 24 per package 

Atlantic City, New Jersey 24 per package 



30 



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